I’m back from Colorado now, and after a couple days rest and catching up I’m hoping I’ll get to work on those projects I keep publicly announcing. It was a very sudden and impromptu trip, and it was great. While I did take pictures while I was there a lot of them were of my little cousins, and it’s really up to their mother to share them or not so I won’t be posting them here. 

In Denver for the week, no computer, won’t be around much.

More infrared practice.

More infrared practice.

Messing around with infrared.

Messing around with infrared.

Half the reason why I post more photos on here than on deviantart is because it takes me so long to think of titles. 

Look at all the 470k resistors I found under this leaf. 

Oh! It sounds like you might have some awesome pictures!

I have a few up my sleeve. I should be able to queue for a while with some of what has become my usual, plus I’m still working on a couple projects that I’m hoping come together. 

A tip for photographing lightning: If you want the lightning to fill the frame and be the main focus, use a telephoto lens. If you need a wide angle lens to fit the lightning in the frame, it’s time to go inside

There were a few clouds in the sky, and said few clouds were pouring rain. Other than that it was a bright and sunny day. I was amazed at how far I could see the rain falling from and how crystalline it looked in the sunshine. 

angrynerdyblogger:

sixpenceee:

ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS PICTURES TAKEN
The above picture you see is off the elephant’s foot, a radioactive mass. It’s from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. 
These are the effects:
After just 30 seconds of exposure, dizziness and fatigue will find you a week later. Two minutes of exposure and your cells will begin to hemorrhage (ruptured blood vessels); four minutes: vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. 300 seconds and you have two days to live. 
ANOTHER DEADLY PLACE
SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

The coolest thing about this photo is definitely the radiation damage. Look at the bright squiggles, and the way the man seems to be in two places at once. This is because even as the photo is being taken, the radiation is causing severe damage to the camera.
According to another source, the man in the photograph and the cameraman are now dead. Apparently, the radiation would have been too high for them to live more than a few years after this, even if they had just run in, snapped the photo, and ran out again. If they spent more than a few seconds here, it’s possible they could have died even quicker.

angrynerdyblogger:

sixpenceee:

ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS PICTURES TAKEN

The above picture you see is off the elephant’s foot, a radioactive mass. It’s from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. 

These are the effects:

After just 30 seconds of exposure, dizziness and fatigue will find you a week later. Two minutes of exposure and your cells will begin to hemorrhage (ruptured blood vessels); four minutes: vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. 300 seconds and you have two days to live. 

ANOTHER DEADLY PLACE

SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

The coolest thing about this photo is definitely the radiation damage. Look at the bright squiggles, and the way the man seems to be in two places at once. This is because even as the photo is being taken, the radiation is causing severe damage to the camera.

According to another source, the man in the photograph and the cameraman are now dead. Apparently, the radiation would have been too high for them to live more than a few years after this, even if they had just run in, snapped the photo, and ran out again. If they spent more than a few seconds here, it’s possible they could have died even quicker.

Find something you like, then do it.

A tip a high school teacher of mine gave me once for writing papers was to write down everything you wanted to take from a source, do that for all your sources, then write from the notes instead of directly from the sources. It helps to organize it in your head as well as giving your own voice.

I got to thinking recently that this may work for art too. Let’s give it a shot, shall we?

  1. Find 3 or 4 pieces of art you really like.
    Not just enjoy looking at, something that you hope your art can look up to and someday be. 
  2. Write down what specifically you like about each piece. Yes, physically write it down. This helps solidify what exactly you’re going for.
    e.g. angular gritty line work, super blurred background, captures the feeling of isolation, etc. Anything that really seems important to you. Some points will take some work to put into words, that’s all part of the exercise. 
  3. Now make a piece of art of your own that includes the points you wrote down.
    Put those glorious examples away and don’t look at them again until you’re finished. 

If you try this within the next week, make a post with your inspirations and results, let me know about it, and I’ll reblog it. I’m going to try this out within the next couple days myself.